who is adrian lister? or умjетник работник рoботник

+- 15 min of storytelling and artist publication (2015, Bains Connective, Brussels)

Adrian Lister is positioned as a statue of an artist, as an idea to follow wherever it takes me. this artistic apprehension is developing into a range of outputs, combined in presentations and in publications that are a compounded documentation of an artistic research. a concept-phrase Умjетник Работник Рoботник is generated to emphasize the scope and the nature of art today, but it can be also understood as a statement about hard work and dedication through simplicity and collective empowerment.‘ (from the introduction of the publication)

Умjетник (Umjetnik) or Artist, translated from Montenegrin language, has etymological root in the verb umjeti, which means: to know, to be able, to be skilled for.
Работник Рoботник (Rabotnik Robotnik) means Worker, and here I am referring to Russian constructivism and productivism, as well as to the desire of those times to involve art in fashion and the market, in reconciliation with communist beliefs.
it’s also in lyrics of a song from Kraftwerk ‘The Robots’

the performance was done intentionally in the kitchen of Bains Connective in Brussels, after two months of a residency there. see part of the storytelling

 

content of the  publication:

What an artist has to do besides making an artwork?
(the list compiled according to internet search)
An interview with Karl Mascara
(a rock ‘n roll band, composed of artist Marius Ritiu & Cristian Bors and Sven Goyvaerts about tendencies to become famous)
4 color pages with objects in their original size

at the last page there is an original piece of my work “The Great Wall”

12

‘Wall-surface taken from a museum-wall by the artist, being employed as a museum technician in February 2014.The first two layers of paint (golden and a base-layer of red) were applied for the exhibition of Michiel Coxcie; underneath there are two white layers (primer white and white) applied for an exhibition by Ugo Rondinone; beneath these is a blue layer, painted for a wall-drawing by Sol Lewitt.
Further knowledge about the layers does not reach the experience of the artist-worker.’